Ed.D. Dissertations

Date of Award

Fall 10-6-2017

Document Type

Open Access Dissertation

College

College of Education

Department

Education

Degree Name

Doctorate of Education, Ed.D.

Faculty Chair

Barbara Weschke, Ph.D.

Content Specialist

Julia Britt, Ed.D.

Content Reader

Peggy Dupey, Ed.D.

Keywords

Teacher efficacy, Classroom Management, African American Males, Choice Theory

Abstract

This observational case-study examined teacher efficacy and its influence on classroom management when teaching African American males in grades preK-2, through the lens of choice theory (Glasser, 1998). Data were analyzed with the intent of gaining an in-depth understanding of how teacher efficacy influenced classroom management when addressing the needs of survival, power, freedom, fun, and belonging of African American males in grades preK-2. Through the use of professional development, the intended goal was to discover insight of how to better assist teachers in supporting the social and emotional needs of their African American male students in grades preK-2. The researcher expected to find a relationship between classroom management and teacher efficacy, when considering the influences of various elements such as professional development, teacher bias, the availability of educational resources, and cultural awareness. Data was collected from pre-and post-professional development responses, as well as from observations. Research was conducted in a suburban Illinois school district, located on the outskirts of a major Midwestern city. Participants included 10 teachers whose classroom population consisted of 5 or more African American male students in grades PreK-2. Using the comparative analysis design, teacher pre-and post-professional development responses were compared to one another. Findings revealed that teachers who understood how to fulfill students’ needs of survival, power, freedom, fun, and belonging, through the use of professional development, were able to identify, create, and implement appropriate classroom-management strategies that were directly tailored to the needs and abilities of their African American male students.

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Education Commons

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