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Volume 1, Issue 2: Winter 1993

From the Editor . . .

 

Here we are. The second issue is finally together, despite its lateness. Its lateness is an interesting subject, which in itself relates to what this issue encompasses at this time of publication.

During the week before finals last quarter, as we were finishing layout, Michelangelo struck, crippling our entire system. The day was March 6th.

Michelangelo, for those who are unfamiliar with computers, is a crippling computer virus that strikes on one day, disabling the hard drive. To top this, there was also another virus present to worsen the effect. We lost the layout due to this virus, and had to start from scratch. (I also began to be more religious about making backup copies and checking for viruses daily....)

Viruses were once simple creatures that were just an endless loop of computer pong, and easily correctable. Of course, in the wrong hands, computer viruses have become extremely lethal and deadly, causing more harm than ever thought possible.

Society in general is becoming more complex and the problems with complexity create larger and more devastating problems. Computer viruses are just one area where this is evident. We also see this at the governmental level where more bureaucracy creates more expenditures; diseases such as AIDS continue to be uncurable; university departments have become more specialized; armed conflict has progressed to the point that no one knows who is on the "good" side and on the "bad" side.

Society is fragmented. There seems to be two different views to every issue, and people seemed to be pulled into this polarization. Yet, the authors in these pages examine how to solve this split, or eliminate this split.

Winter must be the most depressing time of year, or darkest time of year, since much of what was sent to us dealt with dark, gothic issues, or dealt with issues in a gothic matter. Just take a glance at Randy Bush's "One Flesh" or Linda Pillifant's "Death By Mutual Agreement."

These are two themes that jumped out at me during my readings of the material, but it is also the last time to do so.

Since I finish my undergraduate work soon, I have opted to resign. This journal has been a vision of mine since I first came to Concordia almost two years ago. After hard work and many hours of lobbying, I was granted the chance to see a literary journal through. I hope the journal will continue to be a quality work after I am gone. Like a child, it is hard to let the journal go after seeing it begin to mature.

Enjoy this issue.

Issue

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The Promethean, Winter 1993
English Department

Artwork

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Untitled Illustration 3
Randy Kohltfarber

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Untitled Illustration 4
Randy Kohltfarber

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Untitled Image
Randy Kohltfarber

Essays

Photographs

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Untitled Photo 1
Randy Kohltfarber

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Untitled Photo 2
Randy Kohltfarber

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Untitled Photo 3
Randy Kohltfarber

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Untitled Photo 4
Randy Kohltfarber

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Untitled Photo 5
Randy Kohltfarber

Poems

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College Love Song
Paul Hadella

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Rememberville
David Robert Falk

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Leda Afterwards
Peter Huggins

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Mother Night
Anita Chase

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Wisteria
Peter Huggins

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The Flight
Bobbi Day

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Twice She Calls
Randall Brian Bush

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The Censor
Steve Jackson

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Wind
Scott Ward

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Orange and Red Sunset
Jennifer Mertes

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Accidentals
R. T. Smith

Stories

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One Flesh
Randall Brian Bush

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The Royal Highway
Steve Jackson

Winter 1993

STAFF
Aaron T. Brown, Editor-in-Chief
Bobbi Day, Prose Editor
Christy Fehyl, Poetry Editor
Tim O'Connor, Visual Arts Editor
Randy Kohltfarber
Lara Inman
Kathy Schneider
Matt Young
Jason Moore
Robert York
Eric Schneider
Steve Jackson

Cover: photo and cover concept by Marshall Serna.
Photograph from the Concordia production of Athol Fugard's My Children, My Africa, directed by Heather Stueve.