Ed.D. Dissertations

Date of Award

6-2018

Document Type

Open Access Dissertation

College

College of Education

Department

Education

Degree Name

Doctorate of Education, Ed.D.

Faculty Chair

John Mendes, Ed.D.

Content Specialist

Jeanette Amayo, Ed.D.

Content Reader

Donna Hawkins, Ph.D

Keywords

Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM), Northwest Evaluation Assessment (NWEA), Kinesthetic Learning, Elementary Science Program (ESP)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine if a relationship existed between two schools with regard to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and the growth scores from the Northwest Evaluation Assessment (NWEA). The research questions that guided this study were: (a) To what extent, if any, will students that have STEM intervention one day per week demonstrate increased NWEA English language scores on state tests? and (b) To what extent, if any, will students that have STEM intervention one day per week demonstrate increased NWEA mathematics scores on state tests? Kinesthetic learning was used to develop an understanding of how students learn in STEM. The sample for the study was randomly selected using 260 fourth-grade students in School A and School B within the William Floyd School District. The assessment used in the study to determine evidence of growth scores was the Northwest Evaluation Assessment (NWEA). The assessment results were compared from September 2016 to June 2017 in both reading and mathematics to determine if there was a relationship between School A and School B based on whether the schools maintained a STEM intervention or not. A t-test was conducted, and the results showed no significance in the scores. These results deliver telling information on whether or not a STEM intervention makes a difference on Grade 4 growth scores on the NWEA.

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