Ed.D. Dissertations

Date of Award

Spring 2-4-2019

Document Type

Open Access Dissertation

College

College of Education

Department

Education

Degree Name

Doctorate of Education, Ed.D.

Faculty Chair

Belle Booker-Zorigian, Ph.D.

Content Specialist

Joanna Gilmore, Ph.D.

Content Reader

Leslie Loughmiller, Ph.D.

Keywords

special education, juvenile justice, retention, teacher efficacy, support, stress, burnout, workload

Abstract

The number of juveniles with disabilities entering the juvenile justice system is growing at a rapid rate. Many juvenile justice facilities are unable to provide adequate special education services due to the nationwide shortage of special education teachers. This dissertation uses the theoretical framework of teacher efficacy to examine the correlation among the retention of special education teachers who serve students within the juvenile justice system and teacher efficacy, stress, support, workload stressors, and burnout. The participants of this study consisted of 155 special education teachers who currently or previously provided special education services to juveniles within the juvenile justice system. The research design for this quantitative study is a correlational research design that implements surveys as the data collection produces. The principal investigator used six multinomial logistic regression models were used to examine the relationships among the retention rate of special education teachers who serve students within the juvenile justice system and teacher efficacy, stress, workload stressors, burnout, and support. The results of this study indicated that teacher efficacy and workload stressors are significant predictors of support, support is a significant predictor of workload stressors, and support is a significant predictor of the retention of special education teachers who serve students within the juvenile justice system.

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