Ed.D. Dissertations

Date of Award

7-2019

Document Type

Open Access Dissertation

College

College of Education

Department

Education

Degree Name

Doctorate of Education, Ed.D.

Faculty Chair

William Boozang, Ed.D.

Content Specialist

Tara Jabbaar Gyambrah, Ph.D.

Content Reader

Meg Cavalier, Ed.D.

Keywords

nonprofits, African-Americans, mentor relationships, qualitative study, transformational leadership, phenomenology

Abstract

This dissertation in transformational leadership demonstrates and characterizes research that support minority leaders seeking leadership roles within the nonprofit sector across New York state. This study gathered and learned varied perspectives and experiences of mentor relationships by interviewing people of color, primarily mature, African-American leaders from nonprofit organizations in New York state. The primary goal of this study was to determine trends and test the assumption whether mentor relationships would affect and influence African-Americans seeking executive level nonprofit leadership. The phenomenological design used for this study included face-to-face interviews and demographic surveys from individuals who participated in the study. This study contributes to the study of transformational leadership in that it provides future leaders lived experiences of how mentor relationships encouraged, motivated, and build other leaders over time. Results of the study show that mentor relationships have a significant impact and influence on job attainment, continued growth and development in the workplace, and changes the narrative for people of color, namely African-Americans.

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Education Commons

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