Ed.D. Dissertations

Date of Award

Winter 10-20-2019

Document Type

Open Access Dissertation

College

College of Education

Department

Education

Degree Name

Doctorate of Education, Ed.D.

Faculty Chair

Belle B. Booker- Zorigian, Ph.D.

Content Specialist

Joanna Gilmore, Ph.D.

Content Reader

Tony Goss, Ph.D.

Keywords

music education, student self-efficacy beliefs, quantitative study, middle school, band, student retention, Music Performance Self-Efficacy Scale

Abstract

This study sought to explore the problem of student retention in music, specifically between eighth and ninth grade. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between eighth-grade band students’ self-efficacy beliefs and their desire to participate in band. Bandura’s (1977) four sources of self-efficacy (mastery experiences, vicarious experiences, verbal/ social persuasions, and students’ physiological state) were the theoretical framework that guided this study. The participants in this study consisted of 68 eighth grade band students who had at least one year of band experience. This quantitative study used the Music Performance Self-Efficacy Scale, specially designed by Zelenak (2010), to measure Bandura’s (1977) four sources of self-efficacy and examine whether there is a relationship between self-efficacy belief and students’ desire to continue in band. A qualitative component of post survey interviews was added to gain deeper understanding of middle school band students and their self-efficacy beliefs. The quantitative results of this study indicated there is no statistically significant relationship between students’ self-efficacy beliefs and their desire to participate in band. However, the qualitative results did indicate that students’ self-efficacy beliefs did influence their decision to continue in band. This study may help music educators understand student self-efficacy beliefs, adding to the body of knowledge.

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