Ed.D. Dissertations

Date of Award

4-2020

Document Type

Open Access Dissertation

College

College of Education

Department

Education

Degree Name

Doctorate of Education, Ed.D.

Faculty Chair

Chris Jenkins, Ph.D.

Content Specialist

Brandy Kamm, Ph.D.

Content Reader

Charles Bindig, Ph.D.

Keywords

teacher, career and technical education (CTE), career and technical teacher, self-efficacy, traditionally certified CTE teacher, alternatively certified CTE teacher, traditional certification, alternative certification

Abstract

Self-efficacy is important to be a successful teacher. As a result of successful teacher demands, veteran traditionally certified and alternatively certified career and technical education (CTE) teachers must be aware of their perception of their self-efficacy. Bandura’s (1977) foundational theory on self-efficacy was utilized as a conceptual framework to demonstrate the perception of veteran traditionally and alternatively certified CTE teachers. This phenomenological study enlisted 17 participants to investigate their perception of their self-efficacy of veteran traditionally certified and alternatively certified CTE teachers. This phenomenological study utilized interviews as qualitative instrumentation methods to answer the two research questions. Narratives and tables were used to depict the findings. The findings revealed that participants possess a range of descriptions that focused on self-efficacy. This study identified four themes that included classroom management, students’ experiences, non-CTE administrators, and educators’ support/relationship and effectiveness of planning. The range of descriptions that focused on self-efficacy was a by-product of certification, clarity of the importance of CTE to future careers, and mentor builds stronger self-efficacy. The study revealed the range of descriptions that focused on the self-efficacy of the veteran traditionally certified and alternatively certified CTE teacher.

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Education Commons

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